Schools Restrict Parental Access to Own Children

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Finding the right school for your child is always difficult. A parent must reconcile a great many disparate elements in determining the right fit. A quality education is the foremost goal for most parents, but having a school with the right cultural sensitivities (and for the right price) is also important.

Many elite schools and academies require as much buy-in from parents as from students. Though the person attending the school is ultimately responsible for tests and homework, it often falls on the parent to schedule life in such a way that there is enough time for study and schoolwork, as well as ensuring transportation and attendance. Many schools wish to place the onus for success clearly on the child, and one of the central ways this is done is by limiting parental access to their children during the school day. Some schools are closed campuses, with no communication between student and parent once the parent drops their child off in the morning.

Though parental involvement in education has long been associated with improved outcomes for students, there is nothing inherently wrong with a school that wishes to improve student responsibility, even if that includes closing the campus. But by doing so, the school also opens itself to higher expectations from the parents regarding supervision. In a school where parents are allowed to volunteer, or even just attend lunch with their child, parents have the opportunity to observe first-hand whether or not the school is taking the safety of their child seriously. When a parent is excluded entirely from the school, administrators are signaling full responsibility for supervision.

If your child has been injured in a school accident, determining whether or not the school was negligent in its supervisory capacity is important. Please, consider consulting with an experienced attorney regarding your case, and hold the school responsible for any shortcomings in taking care of its students.