Recent Zithromax Warning and Other Defective Drugs

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Adverse side effects from taking a drug that has been labeled defective are a leading cause of death among adults. A drug can be deemed defective when the negative side effects outweigh the positive outcome. The list of defective drugs is long when it comes to products manufactured and prescribed which later proved to cause severe ailments or death in those who take the drug. Often, the defective drugs are not recalled before several serious side effects among its users have already occurred.

Recently the FDA issued findings supported by the New England Journal of Medicine about side effects including possible fatal heart rhythms in those who were prescribed Zithromax, which also goes by the names Azithromycin, Z-Pak (for a six-day dosage), Tri-Pack (for a three-day dosage), Z-max or Azin. While the FDA does everything they can to further confirm the studies by issuing warnings and updated reports, you may find that you have suffered some of the serious side effects from Zithromax or from some of the other drugs listed here:

  • Wellbutrin: Generally used as an antidepressant and prescribed in the early stages of pregnancy for women suffering from depression. Can cause seizures, stroke or psychological disorders in adults, and possible birth defects in children whose mothers took Wellbutrin while they were pregnant.
  • Paxil: Prescribed to those suffering from anxiety disorders, depression and panic disorders. Could cause birth defects when prescribed in pregnant women or those considering becoming pregnant.
  • Celebrex: Anti-inflammatory medication prescribed to aid in pain relief such as in cases of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Could cause cardiopulmonary complications, stroke or blood clots.
  • Prozac: Often prescribed to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic attacks and eating disorders. Has been linked to serious birth defects and other life-threatening conditions in newborns.

Your pharmacist and physician should always clearly explain the side effects of taking a prescribed medication, and how best to take the drug. Your family physician should also be aware of your personal history and that of your family so that any side effects can be treated immediately by stopping the drug, or by prescribing a modified dose. Once a prescribed drug is started, however, it can cause more harm to stop it immediately than it would be to taper off taking it. Always go by the advice of your physician if it is deemed that you must stop taking the drug.

If you were prescribed any of the above drugs (or want to see an expanded list of defective drugs) and know that you or your children have suffered some of the advanced serious side effects and conditions that resulted from taking that drug, you may have the beginning of a defective drug lawsuit, whether individual or as part of a class action suit. You should contact an attorney in New York or your state to assist you in the process. This type of lawsuit is not rare, and could involve dealing with several entities such as the United States Food and Drug Administration, your physician or pharmacist, and any companies that manufacture or market the drug or the drug by any other name.

When prescribed a drug that you have not taken before, always review and be aware of any side effects. Notify your physician immediately if you experience prolonged side effects, difficulty breathing or swallowing, or any other life-threatening conditions.