Placental Abruption Risk Factors

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Placental abruption when the placenta separates from the uterine lining unexpectedly, resulting in significant dangers to the unborn baby. The placenta is responsible for carrying nutrients and oxygen from the mother to the fetus, and is the primary connection between the mother and her child until the child is safely delivered. When the placenta is not functioning properly, the baby may suffer oxygen deprivation or malnutrition.

Placental abruption can be complete or partial, and in cases where only a partial detachment occurs, medical treatment may allow the pregnancy to continue to progress for a limited amount of time. If the separation is complete, emergency Caesarian section is indicated to prevent stillbirth.

Expectant mothers should be aware of the risk factors for placental abruption, which may help them determine whether they are facing elevated odds of this dangerous condition. Risk factors include:

  • Smoking during pregnancy
  • Hypertension
  • Preeclampsia
  • Trauma to the abdomen

If any of these are indicated, the doctor should be particularly attentive to the risks and symptoms. The mother may be advised to have ultrasounds performed more often, or a fetal Doppler may be used to monitor heartrate, as changes in the fetal heartbeat often indicate fetal distress that requires immediate medical intervention. The mother may also be put on bedrest.

When dealing with placental abruption, time is of the essence. A quick diagnosis and treatment often yields excellent outcomes and healthy mothers and babies. Failure to act quickly can have horrific consequences. If you or someone you love has suffered unnecessarily due to a delayed diagnosis of placental detachment, please reach out to a qualified lawyer about your case. Only by holding medical professionals accountable for their failures will new and better policies be developed and adopted to prevent other mothers and children from suffering unnecessarily.