Paralysis Victims Find Hope with New Research

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It seemed bad luck was running in the family. Just eight months after his brother was paralyzed in an accident, Adam Chaffee was injured while boating on a lake. His prognosis was the same as his brother’s. Long-term paralysis, including no use of his hands. Muscle atrophy would spread to most of his body.

But even as he could have given up, Adam Chaffee decided to work to create his own good luck. He began researching potential treatments for his devastating condition, and he discovered a Phase 1 trial was being held in Chicago. The goal of the trial was to use stem cells to allow people who have been paralyzed to regain some function in their limbs.

Boating accidents are a surprisingly common cause of serious head, neck, and spine injuries, in large part because:

  • Despite moving at high speeds, boats lack many safety features of cars, such as air bags and seats designed to put safety first
  • Boaters frequently come into contact with other, less experienced boaters, who cause accidents at a disproportionately high rate
  • Emergency crews can have difficulty responding quickly to boating accidents
  • People injured in boat accidents are sometimes not found by rescue crews for significant amounts of time

Though this new stem cell trial is specifically for people who have been injured very recently, there is hope that additional research can yield treatments for people who have been paralyzed for much longer. The first step is stemming the breakdown of the nervous system and musculature before it gets worse. From there, rebuilding it may be possible.

If you or someone you love has been injured in a boating accident, getting the care you need can be difficult and expensive. Please contact a qualified attorney who can help you get the settlement you are entitled to and the medical care and physical therapy you need to get your life back on track.