Highway Accidents: Staying Safe During Travel Time

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It is estimated that hundreds of thousands of Americans drive on highways and freeways on a regular basis for their commutes to work or for travel for business or pleasure. While some times of the day may prove to be better times for travel, not all of us have the advantage of taking to the roads at the optimum times. Distinct situations and circumstances come about from highway travel that we will not encounter when travelling on rural roads or city streets. What are some distinct situations that occur mostly on highways and freeways, and how can those situations be avoided?

Distracted driving takes on a whole new meaning when it comes to highway and interstate travel. Because of the long stretches of road, drivers think they are safer than normal for checking cell phones or messages and texts, or plugging into to a GPS device for navigation. Passing other cars becomes a situation where we have to take our lives in our own hands, not knowing whether the other driver is paying attention or not. Motorcycles remain difficult to see, particularly around bends in the road or maneuvering through the mountains in certain stretches of the drive. Isolation makes it slower for emergency officials to respond, and at times, have to maneuver their vehicles or helicopters in difficult places.

When you are forced to travel on a freeway or highway, what are some things you can do to ensure that you are not involved in a fatality or other serious injury?

  • While it may seem obvious, paying attention to the road is just as critical on highways or freeways as it is when you are driving around your own town.
  • Be sure that the driver of a semi or 18-wheeler can see you before you pass.
  • Report any driver you see who may be consistently hugging the line or weaving in and out of traffic.
  • Pay attention to mile markers so that you have positions of location if you were to have an accident.
  • Know where you are going before you start your journey; keeping a GPS available is handy, but only if you do not have to take your eyes off the road every few seconds to look at it.
  • Be sure that you can see all vehicles around you before you pass, approach an entrance to a freeway, or drive off an exit.

Highway travel is a must for many, and often there is no other alternative to take us from Point A to Point B. But, as with any driving, it pays to drive defensively and be aware of our surroundings. If you or someone you know has be injured in a motor vehicle accident, there could be many challenges ahead. Seek the advice of a reputable law firm to help you with your case.