Appropriate Blood Clot Diagnoses Still Lacking

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The vacuum is one of the most useful devices to have around the house. With the ability to suck dirt from crevices, the vacuum has long been a staple in most American homes. The basic technology is simple: a fan blows in the vacuum cleaner, creating a pressure differential that is the basis of the vacuum suction. There’s a reason the vacuum is the go-to staple for housecleaning: it’s efficient and it’s effective.

The same basic idea is now being applied to treating blood clots around the heart. The new tool has a basic design, wherein:

  • A small balloon is inserted into the vein or artery near the blood clot
  • The vacuum tube is inserted behind the balloon
  • The vacuum tube is used to create a pressure differential which expands the balloon
  • The balloon pushes the blood clot where the surgeon would like it to go, often into a receptacle which can then be removed

Blood clots are a common occurrence in America, and treatments for blood clots have often been blood thinners. Unfortunately, many of these carry significant risk profiles, and most blood thinners have limited effects on certain large clots or clots in certain parts of the bodies. Breakthroughs like this can be used not only to treat blood clots near the heart, but also cerebral blood clots, which are very complicated to treat with other methods.

However, blood clots can only be treated after proper diagnosis, and America still has a major problem with prompt diagnosis of this condition. All too often doctors miss the early signs of blood clots, and the clots are not discovered until the person has a stroke or other significant medical event. By then, a negative outcome is all but assured.

If you or someone you love has suffered due to a missed diagnosis of blood clots, you are likely dealing with one of those negative outcomes. Figuring out how to make ends meet can be difficult, and affording necessary healthcare can seem impossible. Please, retain an experienced attorney who can help you hold the person who missed the diagnosis accountable for their actions.