A New Dressing for Burn Victims

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A major breakthrough in Birmingham, England has the potential to put an end to scarring caused by burns. The developers are ready to make a trial run, treating burn victims in the area with these new patches that stimulate the regrowth of normal tissue rather than scar tissue. If the first trials in the local hospital are successful, they are hoping to take the product worldwide in the next few years.

Scar tissue serves an important purpose in the human body. Whenever serious injury occurs, the body must do whatever it can to minimize the risk of infection. Normal tissue grows too slowly in many cases, meaning the body must produce scar tissue to close the wound quickly.

This new breakthrough uses the same molecule the body uses for generating new tissue. Applied as a patch, it increases the rate new normal tissue is generated, rendering scar tissue unneeded. Best of all, the new dressing has a long shelf-life, and can be shipped dry before being rehydrated with a saline solution. This means that hospitals all over the world can keep it in stock for when they need it, rather than having to order it.

The developers see a wide variety of potential emergency uses, including:

  • On battlefields, where burn wounds are extremely common
  • In ambulances, where quick treatment can make a huge difference
  • In third world countries, where serious burn injuries are more common, and where access to high quality healthcare is rare

The possibility of putting an end to burn scarring is extremely exciting, but only time will tell if the new product is as useful as it sounds. Medical breakthroughs are the key to providing higher quality care in the decades to come.

Unfortunately, many people have already suffered serious burn scars, and the new product will not address existing burns. If you or someone you love suffered a burn due to the negligence of another, don’t hesitate to contact an attorney to help you hold the liable party to account and get the compensation you are entitled to.