Electrical Shock Fall Dangers

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Electrical shock is always dangerous, and site supervisors and contractors should do everything possible to avoid exposing workers to live current. An electrical shock can result in cardiac arrest, resulting in the death of the worker. Even less serious shocks can still cause electrical burns and other long-term health problems.

Though the risk of electrical injury should never be taken lightly, extra care should be taken with workers who are performing tasks higher than floor level. Electrical current is powerful, and can jolt even large men several feet. If this happens on a ledge or while working on an overhead line, the jolt can cause a person to fall to their death.

There are a variety of extra precautions to take when working above floor level, including:

  • Turning off the electrical current at the breaker box
  • Utilizing harnesses and extra safety apparatuses
  • Using volt-meters and other devices to measure the current of exposed lines

A fall from any height is dangerous, especially as electrical shock may render the individual unable to control their fall or brace themselves in any way. Higher heights are even more dangerous, and any height over 10 feet is highly likely to result in significant injury or even death.

Luckily, almost all electrical shock injuries are preventable through proper workplace safety programs. Proper use of conduit and other materials to limit exposure to live lines is one step contractors can take to minimize these risks, but there are dozens of other good safety practices that can make a life or death difference for workers.

If you or someone you love has suffered an electrical injury at the jobsite, and you believe unsafe work conditions may have been a factor, please reach out to a qualified lawyer. An experienced attorney can guide you through the process of making your case and obtaining the compensation you are entitled to.