Bard IVC Filters Defectively Designed

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Bard has been designing IVC blood filters for years, going through a number of product lines with names such as Recovery, Eclipse, and Meridian. The two most recent models are the Denali and the Simon Nitinol. Whenever a developer chooses to constantly rename iterations of their products instead of attempting to build brand loyalty, it begs the question as to why they do not want to be associated with past products. In the case of Bard, the answer is simple. Those past products have put lives at risk.

An IVC filter is designed to prevent blood clots from traveling, using spider-like legs to filter the clots and prevent stroke or pulmonary embolism. The legs of the device allow it to embed in the blood vessel, holding it in place while it does its job. Strokes and pulmonary embolisms can be catastrophic and deadly, so a safe method of preventing them is important.

Unfortunately, the IVC filters designed by Bard (and many other manufacturers) are not safe. The primary risks involved with these filters are based around component failure, and are a result of defective design. The legs and other parts of the device can break off, risking perforation of blood vessels or internal organs.

In addition to the risk of significant internal damage, in many cases the person whose IVC filter has failed is not aware of the failure. In those situations, the person is at risk of pulmonary embolism or stroke due to the fact there is nothing preventing the clots from traveling to those areas of the body.

If you or someone you love has suffered unnecessarily after having an IVC filter implanted, it is important to understand that this product was defective from the start. Holding the company accountable is the only way to deter future instances of defective design. Please consult with an experienced attorney regarding your case.