ATV Accidents: A Word to the Wise

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Two more riders operating all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) died on back-to-back days in Wisconsin in July, and the local authorities are trying their best to educate local riders about the dangers of the hobby. ATV accidents remain far too common in this country, resulting in hundreds of deaths and hundreds of thousands of emergency room visits. Millions of dollars are spent on medical bills, and millions more are lost in wages when people miss work for long periods of time following serious injury.

A great many of these injuries occur on state and federal land, leaving state and federal officials in charge of the investigations, a difficult task for any agency. Oftentimes, park rangers are tasked with helping to piece together the accident, especially when the rider is killed or injured in such a way that there are no reliable witnesses.

Because of their experience with these matters, rangers are very familiar with the common thread that binds these tragedies. A Wisconsin park ranger, who is charged with investigating the two recent deaths, recently told the local news that many riders who are seriously injured meet the following qualifications:

  • They do not wear helmets, gloves, or other basic safety equipment.
  • They ride at night or in areas with poor visibility.
  • They do not perform proper maintenance on their vehicles.
  • They drive at excessive speeds.
  • They drive while under the influence.

If you and your family enjoy riding on ATVs, safety must always be the primary priority. But even when you’ve done everything you can, there is still a chance of something terrible happening, either because of faulty production of the vehicle or an unexpected problem with the terrain.

If you or a loved one has been seriously injured in an ATV accident, or if someone you care about has been killed, it is important that a complete investigation take place. The local authorities are likely doing their best, but cannot always give each accident the attention it deserves. The only way to be completely certain all the right questions are being asked is to contact a qualified attorney. Make sure you and your loved ones get the answers you need to move on.