Pedestrian Accidents: A Grandparent's Nightmare

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It’s a grandparent’s nightmare. On March 16th, Charles Napier, of Florence, Ohio, was walking with his wife and pulling his grandchildren in a red wagon when they were struck by a car driven by a 22 year old woman. The car swerved onto the shoulder of the road, striking Mr. Napier and the wagon. The two children, 13 month old twins, and Mr. Napier were pronounced dead at the scene, despite emergency CPR being provided almost immediately by a passing motorist.

Grim stories like this are a reminder of just how vulnerable our children are. As parents and grandparents, we want to keep our children and grandchildren safe, but we also want to let them be children. We want to let them play outside. We want to walk with them to the park. We want to pull them down the street in red wagons.

Practicing pedestrian safety is important, and there are a few elements to this story that are worth passing on to others. The road where this accident took place was:

  • Narrow, leaving little room for a car to pass. Even a slight swerve of the vehicle was enough to bring it into contact with the pedestrians
  • Usually light on traffic. Some drivers are more likely to text and drive or look down at the radio station on streets where they don’t expect to encounter other drivers or pedestrians
  • Without traffic lights, signs, or speed bumps to dictate the flow of traffic, allowing cars to move at high rates of speed

We must always be aware of the streets we are walking on, and we should pay careful attention to any aspect of the road that seems to make an accident more likely to occur. But even when we notice these things, there is little we can do when a vehicle swerves up onto the shoulder of the road.

If you or a loved one has been injured in a pedestrian car accident, it is extremely important that you contact an attorney. Cities and towns across America frequently hesitate to add any type of traffic control to roads until after a tragedy occurs. With the right lawyer, you can push cities to make necessary safety changes before someone is terribly injured or killed.